Our cardiologists offer a comprehensive and progressive cardiac care service. Your consultation will involve discussion about your health and medical history. Depending on the individual, the consult may involve addressing preventative issues such as diet, exercise, blood pressure control and cholesterol management as well as any previously identified cardiovascular concerns. All your options may be explored during your consultation.

If it has been identified that further investigation via cardiac testing or a procedure is required this will be discussed with you.

Please contact us if you have any further queries or please read below for more information on Cardiac Testing or click on Procedures.

Echocardiogram

Echocardiogram-AccessAn Echocardiogram or Echo is an ultrasound assessment of the heart that can evaluate the structures of the heart using a series of images and videos. A trained technician will place a special probe on various parts of the chest wall to view the heart from different directions.

A detailed assessment of the heart valves, heart muscle and blood flow is then performed. The test usually takes 30 minutes.

On the day of the test

  • Please bring your referral letter to the appointment.
  • Do not consume alcohol or caffeine, or smoke in the 3 hours before your test.

EchocardiogramDuring the test

  • You will need to undress to the waist (women will be given a gown to wear throughout the test).
  • Electrodes will be placed onto your chest and the Technician will perform an ultrasound of your heart while you rest on a bed.

After the test

  • A full report will be sent to your Doctor after the results have been reviewed by a Cardiologist (usually within 3 – 4 working days).

Cardiology Consultation and Testing

Our cardiologists offer a comprehensive and progressive cardiac care service. Your consultation will involve discussion about your health and medical history. Depending on the individual, the consult may involve addressing preventative issues such as diet, exercise, blood pressure control and cholesterol management as well as any previously identified cardiovascular concerns. All your options may be explored during your consultation.

If it has been identified that further investigation via cardiac testing or a procedure is required this will be discussed with you.

Please contact us if you have any further queries or please read below for more information on Cardiac Testing or click on Procedures.

Ablation

Catheter ablation is an invasive procedure performed in a Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory, used to remove or terminate a faulty electrical pathway from sections of the hearts of those who are prone to developing cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

Exercise Stress Echocardiogram

This test measures the performance and capacity of the heart and blood vessels in response to increasing workload (exercise). Testing consists of walking on a treadmill, the speed and gradient of which are increased every three minutes. An Echocardiogram (an ultrasound of your heart) will be taken immediately before and after the exercise period to see how your heart responds to stress. A trained technician will place a special probe on various parts of the chest wall to take a series of images and videos the heart from different directions.

On the day of the test

  • Please bring a list of your current medications.
  • Wear a two-piece outfit and comfortable footwear (e.g. walking shoes or joggers).
  • Do not use body lotion or wear neck chains.
  • Have a light breakfast only and do not eat for 3 hours before your test.
  • Do not consume alcohol or caffeine, or smoke in the 3 hours before your test.

Immediately before starting the test

  • You will need to undress to the waist (women will be given a gown to wear while exercising).
  • Men may require part of the chest to be shaved.
  • Electrodes will be placed onto your chest and the Technician will perform an ultrasound of your heart at rest.
  • An ECG device will then be fitted around your waist.

During the exercise test

  • You will be supervised by an experienced Doctor and Cardiac Technician.
  • The speed and incline of the treadmill will be increased every 3 minutes, stopping when you feel exhausted.
  • Your blood pressure, pulse rate and electrocardiogram will be monitored continuously.
  • If you feel unwell in any way during the test, tell the doctor immediately. The test will stop if there are any observations that concern the doctor, if you become tired or breathless or if you develop chest pain or other symptoms.

After the exercise test

  • You will be removed from the treadmill and placed on the bed AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE after the stress test so the Technician can perform a final ultrasound of your heart.
  • You will be asked to remain seated for a further 10 minutes to ensure you are fully recovered before leaving the Medical Centre.
  • A full report will be sent to your Doctor after the results have been reviewed by a Cardiologist.

Procedures

Access Cardiology specialists offer cardiac care that is progressive and of the highest standard in their field. Be certain you are in safe hands.

Our cardiologists have admitting rights to Fiona Stanley Hospital and Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. If you are privately insured, procedures are performed at The Mount Hospital.

Alcohol Septal Ablation

An Alcohol Septal Ablation is a minimally-invasive treatment performed by an Interventional Cardiologist to relieve symptoms and improve the functional capacity in symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a condition of the heart whereby the heart muscle grows abnormally thick without any obvious cause (such as high blood pressure). This abnormal thickening of the heart muscle can make it harder for the heart to pump blood around the body.

Electrocardiogram

ElectrocardiogramAn electrocardiogram is used to monitor your heart. Each beat of your heart is triggered by an electrical impulse normally generated from special cells in the upper right chamber of your heart. An electrocardiogram — also called an ECG, it records these electrical signals as they travel through your heart.

Your doctor can use an electrocardiogram to look for patterns among these heartbeats and rhythms to diagnose various heart conditions.

An electrocardiogram is a noninvasive, painless test. The results of your electrocardiogram will likely be reported the same day it’s performed, and your doctor will discuss them with you at your next appointment.

Cardioversion

Cardioversion is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm using electricity or medications. Synchronized electrical cardioversion uses a therapeutic dose of electric current to the heart at a specific moment in the cardiac cycle. Pharmacologic cardioversion uses anti-arrhythmia medication instead of an electrical shock.

Exercise ECG Stress Test

This test measures the performance and capacity of the heart and blood vessels in response to increasing workload (exercise). Testing consists of walking on a treadmill, the speed and gradient of which are increased every three minutes. Throughout the test a doctor will be present and your pulse, blood pressure and electrocardiography will be monitored. The test will stop if there are any observations that concern the doctor, if you become tired or breathless or if you develop chest pain or other symptoms.

If you feel unwell in any way during the test, tell the doctor immediately.

On the day of the test

  • Please bring a list of your current medications.
  • Wear a two-piece outfit and comfortable footwear (e.g. walking shoes or joggers).
  • Do not use body lotion or wear neck chains.
  • Have a light breakfast only and do not eat for 3 hours before your test.
  • Do not consume alcohol or caffeine, or smoke in the 3 hours before your test.

Immediately before starting the test

  • You will need to undress to the waist (women will be given a gown to wear while exercising on the treadmill).
  • Men may require part of the chest to be shaved.
  • Electrodes will be placed onto your chest and an ECG lead will be worn on a belt around your waist.

During the test

  • You will be supervised by an experienced Doctor and Cardiac Technician.
  • Your blood pressure, pulse rate and electrocardiogram will be monitored continuously.
  • The Doctor will conclude the test when appropriate.

After the test

  • You will be monitored for 5 minutes upon completing the test.
  • You will be asked to remain seated for a further 10 minutes to ensure you are fully recovered before leaving the Medical Centre.
  • A full report will be sent to your Doctor after the results have been reviewed by a Cardiologist.

Coronary Angiogram

A Coronary Angiogram is a procedure where a special X-ray of your heart’s arteries is taken to see if they are narrowed or blocked. A catheter (a long tube) is inserted into an artery in your groin and is moved up inside your artery until it reaches your heart. A special dye is then injected into the tube and x-ray images are taken as the dye is pumped through your heart and coronary arteries (the arteries supplying blood to your heart). These X-rays give clear and accurate information about the state of your heart and coronary arteries.

Holter Monitoring

Holter MonitoringThis is a device which records the electrical activity (ECG) of your heart, usually over a 24 hour period. Connection of the device takes approximately 20 minutes.

On the day of the test

  • Please bath/shower in the morning – you will NOT be able to swim/shower during the 24 hour monitoring period.
  • Do not use body lotion on your chest or wear neck chains.
  • Please wear a 2 piece outfit.

Connection of the device

  • Adhesive electrodes are to be placed on the chest (men may need some hair shaved).
  • A small recording device will be worn across the shoulder or around the waist.

Holter Monitoring-AccessDuring the monitoring period

  • If you experience any symptoms, (even if they are brief or slight) you should press the EVENT button on the machine and make a note of the symptoms in a special diary which will be given to you.
  • If you have any difficulties with the equipment or feel it may have been dislodged, please notify the office on 9389 8658.
  • Please DO NOT tamper with the cords or the battery as this may erase data from the device.
  • Do not sleep on a switched on electric blanket – this will interfere with the ECG recording.
  • Go about your normal daily activities throughout the testing period.

After the 24 hour monitoring period

  • The equipment and symptom diary must be returned at a specific time (usually your scheduled appointment the following day).
  • A full report will be sent to your referring Doctor after the results have been reviewed by a Cardiologist.

Coronary Angioplasty and stenting

Angioplasty (also known as Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, or PCI) is the technique of mechanically widening narrowed or obstructed arteries. An empty and collapsed balloon, known as a balloon catheter, is passed into the narrowed locations and then inflated to a fixed size. The balloon forces expansion of the inner white blood cell/clot plaque deposits and the surrounding muscular wall, opening up the blood vessel for improved flow, and the balloon is then deflated and withdrawn. A stent (metal scaffold) is then placed at the site of the narrowing to keep the artery open.

Event Monitoring

Event monitoringThis is a device which records the electrical activity (ECG) of your heart, usually over a 7-day period. Connection of the device takes approximately 20 minutes.

On the day of the test

  • You may be required to have a baseline ECG test done before you are fitted with the Event Monitor.
  • Do not use body lotion on your chest or wear neck chains.
  • Please wear a 2 piece outfit.

Connection of the device

  • Adhesive electrodes are to be placed on the chest (men may need some hair shaved).
  • A small recording device will be worn across the shoulder or around the waist.

During the monitoring period

  • If you experience any symptoms, (even if they are brief or slight) you should press the EVENT button on the machine and make a note of the symptoms in a special diary which will be given to you.
  • If you have any difficulties with the equipment or feel it may have been dislodged, please notify the office on 9389 8658.
  • Please DO NOT tamper with the battery as this may erase data from the device.
  • Do not sleep on a switched on electric blanket – this will interfere with the ECG recording.
  • Go about your normal daily activities throughout the testing period.

After the monitoring period

  • The equipment and symptom diary must be returned at a specific time (usually your scheduled appointment the following week).
  • A full report will be sent to your referring Doctor after the results have been reviewed by a Cardiologist.

Electrophysiology Study

An electrophysiology study (EP study) is a minimally invasive procedure that assesses the electrical activity and conduction pathways of the heart. EP studies are performed in a Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory to determine the cause and location of any abnormal beats or heart rhythms and helps identify the most appropriate forms of treatment. This type of study is performed by a Cardiac Electrophysiologist.

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

Ambulatory Blood Pressure MonitoringThis device automatically measures your blood pressure at regular intervals during the day and night for a 24 hour period. Connection of the device takes approximately 20 minutes.

On the day of the test

  • Please bathe/shower in the morning – you will NOT be able to swim/shower during the 24 hour monitoring period
  • Please wear a 2 piece outfit.

Connection of the device

  • A blood pressure cuff will be placed on the upper arm and must remain in place throughout the entire monitoring period.
  • A small recording device will be worn across the shoulder or around the waist.

During the monitoring period

  • When the device beeps, it is about to take a blood pressure measurement. Please sit or stand still, stop talking and keep your cuffed arm straight until the cuff deflates.
  • If you experience any symptoms (even if they were brief or slight), press the event EVENT button on the device, and make a note of the symptoms in the special diary which will be given to you.
  • Please press the day-night Day/Night button once when you go to sleep and once when you wake up.
  • If you have any difficulties with the equipment or feel it may have been dislodged, please notify the office on 9389 8658.
  • Go about your normal activities throughout the testing period.

After the 24 hour monitoring period

  • The equipment and symptom diary must be returned at a specific time (usually your scheduled appointment the following day).
  • A full report will be sent to your Doctor after the results have been reviewed by a Cardiologist.

Renal Artery Denervation

Renal artery denervation is a procedure that aims to treat resistant hypertension (high blood pressure) by using radiofrequency pulses. These radiofrequency pulses are aimed at the renal arteries to cauterise or burn certain nerve endings that have been found to increase blood pressure. Burning these nerve endings effectively ‘silences’ the signals that increase blood pressure, and can reduce overall blood pressure by approximately 30mmHg.

Transoesophageal Echocardiogram (TOE)

A transoesophageal echocardiogram, or TOE, is an alternative way to perform an echocardiogram. A specialized probe containing an ultrasound transducer at its tip is passed into the patient’s oesophagus. This specialised probe, called a transducer, is used to send ultrasound waves to the heart. As the ultrasound waves bounce off the structures of the heart, a computer in the echo machine converts them into pictures on a screen. It has several advantages and some disadvantages compared to a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE).

Artificial Pacemaker Insertion

An artificial pacemaker (not to be confused by the heart’s natural pacemaker) is a medical device that delivers electrical impulses to regulate the beating of the heart. The main reason for needing a pacemaker is when a person’s heart rate is too slow (bradycardic) either because the natural pacemaker of the heart is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. Modern pacemakers are able to be checked externally and the pacing modes can be modified at any stage by a Cardiologist if required. Pacemakers are inserted in a Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory by a Cardiologist.

ICD Insertion

An ICD or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is a small device that looks similar to a pacemaker and may be required if a person’s heart is found to be at risk of going into a dangerous heart rhythm, such as ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. ICDs work by sensing and stopping these dangerous arrhythmias by producing extra beats or electrical shocks to restore the heart to a normal rhythm.

Implantable Loop Recorder

An implantable loop recorder is a small device about the size of a matchbox that is implanted just under the skin of the chest to record the heart’s electrical activity. The monitor will store information as electrocardiograms (ECGs). If an irregular heart rhythm occurs, the recorder will detect the abnormality and store it until it is reviewed by a Technician/Cardiologist.